Rumer Willis, Alcohol, and Recovery

Whether you’re a celebrity, a bank teller, or a teacher, if you’re battling an addiction to alcohol, the challenge is difficult just the same. The addiction doesn’t care about what you do for a living. Oftentimes, many may feel that they are the only ones in their fight against alcohol or substance misuse. The truth is that it’s a disease impacting many from all walks of life. And the good news is there is hope in learning from the experience of those in recovery. There is hope in the number of treatment resources available to help you along your own road to sobriety.

Joy Sutton, host of American Addiction Centers’ (AAC) talk show, Addiction Talk, had the opportunity to interview Actress and Singer Rumer Willis!

In this eye-opening interview, Rumer – daughter of Bruce Willis and Demi Moore — shares her battle with alcohol use and her personal journey of living a life in long-term sobriety. She wants others to know that even though their journey with substance misuse is their very own, they aren’t alone in their experience.

Be sure to tune into future episodes of Addiction Talk, but first catch this transparent and heartfelt episode about how one woman transformed her life.

If you’re struggling with an alcohol use disorder (AUD) or a substance use disorder (SUD), resources are available to help. AAC is a nationwide leader in addiction treatment and provides care in a safe environment under licensed medical professionals. If you’re battling an addiction, please reach out for help.

 

Alcohol Use Disorder and the Journey to Recovery

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is the inability to control alcohol use regardless of negative health, social, and occupational ramifications. It is comprised of what some individuals reference as “alcoholism,” “alcohol dependence,” and “alcohol addiction.” There are varying degrees of severity of an AUD, which include mild, moderate, and severe.

Some who may not have experienced addiction for themselves nor had a close family member who has, may not fully graspWoman sitting at table staring at her drink to decide if she should drink alcohol or not. just what it actually looks like in the real world outside of what’s portrayed in movies, television, and books. Although symptoms and behaviors may be similar between different individuals, an AUD impacts people in a variety of ways.

For example, Rumer shared, “I started having panic attacks with drinking… when I would feel hung over, it would be until 7:00 p.m. the next day.”

And how and when individuals are ready to make the change in their life to seek treatment is ultimately up to them.

“It was not like I had this… huge bottom moment that was like a wake-up call for me. It was really just this moment of ‘Why am I doing this?’” said the Once Upon a Time in Hollywood actress.

Rumer experienced a moment that may be described by some as an epiphany when she realized she was ready to move in a different direction with her life. She explained how she didn’t like that version of herself. That version of herself that was drinking and getting hangovers that lasted until the very next night.

The Sorority Row actress has been sober for nearly five years now. Her journey on the road to recovery began with a decision to participate in “Sober January” for the New Year, which inevitably led to her commitment to sobriety. This is her experience, her story.

Please bear in mind, everyone and every situation is different.

If you’re battling an AUD, you should seek professional medical assistance. Quitting abruptly without any medical supervision or care can be dangerous and even life-threatening under certain circumstances. Because everyone’s body, situation, and degree of severity varies, it’s always best to seek out a licensed medical physician to get the help that you need so that you know what’s best for you.

To learn more about Rumer Willis and the details to her story of recovery and transparency in its entirety, watch this recording of Addiction Talk. And if you find yourself battling with alcohol or drug misuse, please reach out for the help that you need today.

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