Tommy Lee, Alcoholism, and Rehabilitation

October 15, 2020

Oftentimes admitting to something that we aren’t very proud of can be difficult. Not just admitting an unpleasant truth to others, but to ourselves as well. This may often be the case with those battling alcoholism.

The truth is, alcoholism, or alcohol use disorder, is a disease. So, as much as it is an obstacle to confront, it shouldn’t be something that an individual uses against themselves out of shame and guilt. Instead of judging oneself, take a step forward by asking for help.

Motley Crue band member, Tommy Lee, realized that he had a problem with drinking alcohol, and it was long after he first started. Recognizing the problem and then being willing to get help is what set him on the path to recovery. Help comes in the form of treatment, otherwise known as rehabilitation or rehab.

At American Addiction Centers (AAC), a nationwide leader in addiction treatment, we provide medical detox and treatment with professional staff and licensed physicians, as well as aftercare planning all within in a safe environment. If you’re struggling with an alcohol use disorder, please reach out to get the help you need.

 

Alcohol Use Disorder and Rehab Options

Although alcohol use disorder is a treatable disease, there isn’t a cure. Addiction is defined as a chronic medical disease involving the connections between an individual’s environment, personal life experiences, brain circuits, and genetics. Behavior or the use of substances becomes compulsive and continues regardless of dangerous consequences.

Man holding beer needs to Know about binge drinkingThe Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) states that alcohol use disorder is inclusive of both alcohol dependence and abuse. It also states that it contains three sub-classifications: mild, moderate, and severe. These classifications are determined by the severity of the alcohol use disorder.

Rehabilitation comes in different options. Individuals should consult with their primary care physician to help determine what the best options are for their unique situation and medical history.

Rehab often begins with medical detox, a period of supportive care and supervised withdrawal management, as drugs and alcohol are allowed to clear from a patient’s system. With alcoholism this can be especially important because, contingent on the level of physical alcohol dependence, withdrawal could be lethal for an individual attempting to suddenly quit and detox on their own. Consult your physician to make a healthy decision about how you should proceed with your recovery.

Treatment options include:

  • Inpatient rehab.
  • Intensive outpatient program (IOP).
  • Outpatient care.
  • Partial hospitalization program (PHP).

If you or a loved one is struggling with an alcohol use disorder, you’re not alone. There are resources here to help you and treatment options available to achieve long-term sobriety and to live a healthy and productive life.

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