Drug Facts & Substance Abuse Resources

Explore our library of resources for drug addiction written by medical experts.

Physical and Mental Effects of Drugs

Alcohol
Cocaine
Heroin
Marijuana
Meth
Prescription Opioids
See All

Alcohol

How Long Does Alcohol Stay in Your System?

It takes around 25 hours for your body to completely rid alcohol from its system. Alcohol’s half-life is four to five hours, meaning that it takes 4-5 hours for your body to process and dispose of the alcohol you’ve consumed. However, it takes 4-5 half-lives to completely eradicate alcohol from the body.

More About How Long Alcohol Stays In Your System


Signs of Alcohol Withdrawal

Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal begin to peak within 24-72 hours. Some of these symptoms may include:

  • Anxiety.
  • Depression.
  • Irritability.
  • Moodiness or mood swings.
  • Shakiness or tremors.
  • Sweating/clammy skin.
  • Headache.
  • Insomnia.
  • Nausea.
  • Symptoms of delirium tremens, including hallucinations, agitation, fever, seizures, and confusion.

More About Alcohol Withdrawal


Alcohol Overdose/Poisoning

An alcohol overdose refers to an excessive amount of alcohol in someone’s bloodstream. Due to this surplus of alcohol, areas of the brain may begin to shut down. Symptoms of alcohol overdose may include:

  • Confusion.
  • Difficulty remaining conscious.
  • Vomiting.
  • Trouble breathing.
  • Slowed heart rate,
  • Sweating or clammy skin.
  • Dulled bodily responses such as no gag reflex (which prevents choking).
  • Low body temperature.

Alcohol overdose can lead to permanent brain damage or death. If you believe that you or a loved one is experiencing an alcohol overdose, call 911 immediately or head to your closest emergency room.

More About Alcohol Overdose & Poisoning

Cocaine

How Long Does Cocaine Stay in Your System?

Cocaine typically stays in someone’s body for around 4-6 hours. After last use, cocaine or its metabolites typically can show up on a blood or saliva test for up to 2 days.


Signs of Cocaine Withdrawal

Symptoms of cocaine withdrawal may include:

  • Agitation, irritability, and restlessness.
  • Depression.
  • Tiredness.
  • Increased appetite.
  • Slowing of activity.

More About Cocaine Withdrawal


Cocaine Overdose

A cocaine overdose refers to an excessive amount of cocaine in someone’s body. Symptoms of cocaine overdose may include:

  • Confusion.
  • Loss of urine control.
  • High body temperature.
  • Sweating.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Fast heart rate.
  • Bluish color of the skin.
  • Difficulty breathing.
  • Seizures.
  • Death.

More About Cocaine Overdose

Slang for Cocaine

Blanca
Crack
Flake
Gold Dust
Icing
Pearl
Snow White

Heroin

How Long Does Heroin Stay in Your System?

Heroin has a relatively short half-life (when compared to drugs like alcohol) of about 30 minutes. For the body to completely metabolize this drug, it may take days. Heroin can still be detected in the body through certain metabolites for around 4 days after last use.

Signs of Heroin Withdrawal

Symptoms of heroin withdrawal may include:

  • Nausea, vomiting, or stomach upset.
  • Anxiety, irritability, or moodiness.
  • Sweating.
  • Chills.
  • Muscle cramps.
  • Watery discharge from eyes and nose.
  • Diarrhea.

More About Heroin Withdrawal


Heroin Overdose

A heroin overdose refers to when someone has an excessive amount of heroin in their body. Symptoms of heroin overdose may include:

  • Lack of breathing.
  • Shallow breathing.
  • Low blood pressure.
  • Small pupils.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Bluish skin.
  • Coma.
  • Disorientation.
  • Drowsiness.
  • Uncontrolled muscle movements.

If you believe that you or a loved one may be experiencing a heroin overdose, call 911 immediately or go to your nearest emergency room.

More About Heroin Overdose

Slang for Heroin

Dope
H
Junk
Skag
Horse
China White
Hero

Marijuana

How Long Does Marijuana Stay in Your System?

The effects of marijuana generally fade within hours, but can last up to 24 hours. For your body to completely eliminate marijuana from your blood, it will take at least a few hours. For regular marijuana users, this drug can be detected in your urine for up to 45 days.

More About How Long Weed Stays In Your System


Signs of Marijuana Withdrawal

Symptoms of cannabis withdrawal may include:

  • Irritability.
  • Cannabis cravings.
  • Anxiety.
  • Aggression.
  • Sleep difficulties.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
  • Wild or vivid dreams.
  • Headaches.

More About Marijuana Withdrawal


Marijuana Overdose

A fatal marijuana overdose is highly unlikely, however, using too much marijuana may result in the amplification of certain effects of this drug. Symptoms of consuming too much marijuana include:

  • Extreme confusion.
  • Anxiety or panic.
  • Paranoia.
  • Rapid heart rate.
  • Hallucinations.
  • Delusions.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Nausea and vomiting.

Slang for Marijuana

Weed
Pot
Grass
Dope
Reefer
Ganja
Hash

Meth

How Long Does Meth Stay in Your System?

Unlike cocaine, a stimulant that’s quickly removed from and almost completely metabolized in the body, meth remains in the body—largely unchanged by the body’s metabolism—much longer, leading to prolonged stimulant effects. It has a half-life of 9-24 hours. This means that it takes 9-24 hours for the amount of meth in a person’s blood to be reduced by half.

More About How Long Meth Stays In Your System


Signs of Meth Withdrawal

According to research, it appears that the primary symptoms during this withdrawal period consist of:

  • Feelings of fatigue, lethargy, and excessive sleepiness (typical of withdrawal from stimulant medications) are common.
  • Increased appetite, dry mouth, and some episodes of jitteriness generally occur.
  • It reaches its peak within the first 7-10 days following discontinuation of the drug.

More About Meth Withdrawal


Meth Overdose

Common symptoms of a meth overdose include:

  • Chest pain
  • Arrhythmias
  • Hypertension or hypotension
  • Difficult or labored breathing
  • Agitation
  • Hallucinations
  • Psychosis
  • Seizures
  • Rapid or slow heartbeat
  • Hyperthermia

If you believe that you or a loved one may be experiencing a methamphetamine overdose, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room immediately.

More About Meth Overdose

Slang for Meth

Speed
Chalk
Trash
Gak
Cookies
No Doze
Cotton Candy
Crank
Wash
Dunk
Pookie
Christina
White Cross
Rocket Fuel

Prescription Opioids

How Long Do Prescription Opioids Stay in Your System?

Short-acting and long-acting prescription opioids, such as Oxycontin, Codeine, Fentanyl, Suboxone, and Morphine, may stay in your system for varying lengths of time, and also depend on your sex, body weight, age, and other personal factors. However, short-acting opioid withdrawal symptoms can typically arise within 8-12 hours of last use, and peak within 1-3 days. These withdrawal symptoms may continue for up to 7 days.

More About How Long Opioids Stay In Your System


Signs of Opioid Withdrawal

Symptoms of prescription opioid withdrawal may include:

  • Nausea, vomiting, or stomach upset.
  • Anxiety, irritability, or moodiness.
  • Sweating.
  • Chills.
  • Muscle cramps.
  • Watery discharge from eyes and nose.
  • Diarrhea.

More About Opioid Withdrawal


Prescription Opioid Overdose

An opioid overdose refers to an excessive amount of prescription opioids in someone’s body. Symptoms of prescription opioid overdose may include:

  • Lack of breathing.
  • Shallow breathing.
  • Low blood pressure.
  • Small pupils.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Bluish skin.
  • Coma.
  • Disorientation.
  • Drowsiness.
  • Uncontrolled muscle movements.

If you believe that you or a loved one may be experiencing a prescription opioid overdose, call 911 immediately or go to your nearest emergency room.

More About Opioid Overdose

Slang for Prescription Opioids

Oxy
Hillbilly
Percs
O.C.
Greenies
Buse
Strips
Lean
Captain Cody
Apache
China Girl
Monkey
Smack
Trammies

Drugs by Name A-Z

A-H
I-N
O-Z
Did you know?
In 2017, 19.7 million people in America suffered with a substance abuse disorder, but only 1.4 million people sought treatment.
OR

Take Our Substance Abuse Assessment

Take our free, 5-minute substance abuse assessment below if you think you or someone you love might be struggling with a substance abuse disorder.
Self-Assessment: Am I Addicted?
Are you worried about yourself or a loved one?
Disclaimer: Only a medical or clinical professional may diagnose a substance use disorder. This assessment may serve as an indicator of a potential addiction but should not replace a diagnosis from a professional treatment provider.

Our Treatment Facilities

Get addiction help now (24/7 helpline)We’re here for you every step of the way.
;